Тема: Louisiana Purchase and Lewis & Clark Summary & Analysis

An overview and history of the Louisiana Purchase, including the Lewis and Clark expedition of the Louisiana Purchase. From the About.com expert Geography.

Home Curriculum Reading Like A Historian U.S. History Lessons Expansion & Slavery 2. Louisiana Purchase

When I was in Haiti this fall, a leader of PAPDA, the grassroots Haitian Platform to Advocate Alternative Development, got a little pissed at me. During an interview across a stately wooden table in PAPDA’s quiet, clean office, Ricot Jean-Pierre raged against the thousands of NGOs that are ostensibly helping Haitians but, in his opinion, more often helping themselves. Haitians need to get control of the recovery process, he explained, get fired up, take back their country from the Americans and the UN and all the other self-serving interfering foreign powers.

This is where our rift occurred. The 12,000 troops running Haiti’s streets are from the UN; the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission is co-chaired by Bill Clinton whom, as Jean-Pierre himself had just reminded me, locals often call the governor or president of Haiti. So I asked Jean-Pierre, gently but a little skeptically, if he thought his foreigner-ousting goal was realistic.

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

dbello | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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Order essay here louisiana purchase essay

An overview and history of the Louisiana Purchase, including the Lewis and Clark expedition of the Louisiana Purchase. From the About.com expert Geography.

Home Curriculum Reading Like A Historian U.S. History Lessons Expansion & Slavery 2. Louisiana Purchase

Facts, information and articles about the Louisiana Purchase, an event of Westward Expansion from the Wild West Louisiana Purchase Facts Date July 4, 1803.

Home Curriculum Reading Like A Historian U.S. History Lessons Expansion & Slavery 2. Louisiana Purchase

When I was in Haiti this fall, a leader of PAPDA, the grassroots Haitian Platform to Advocate Alternative Development, got a little pissed at me. During an interview across a stately wooden table in PAPDA’s quiet, clean office, Ricot Jean-Pierre raged against the thousands of NGOs that are ostensibly helping Haitians but, in his opinion, more often helping themselves. Haitians need to get control of the recovery process, he explained, get fired up, take back their country from the Americans and the UN and all the other self-serving interfering foreign powers.

This is where our rift occurred. The 12,000 troops running Haiti’s streets are from the UN; the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission is co-chaired by Bill Clinton whom, as Jean-Pierre himself had just reminded me, locals often call the governor or president of Haiti. So I asked Jean-Pierre, gently but a little skeptically, if he thought his foreigner-ousting goal was realistic.

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

dbello | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Home Curriculum Reading Like A Historian U.S. History Lessons Expansion & Slavery 2. Louisiana Purchase

When I was in Haiti this fall, a leader of PAPDA, the grassroots Haitian Platform to Advocate Alternative Development, got a little pissed at me. During an interview across a stately wooden table in PAPDA’s quiet, clean office, Ricot Jean-Pierre raged against the thousands of NGOs that are ostensibly helping Haitians but, in his opinion, more often helping themselves. Haitians need to get control of the recovery process, he explained, get fired up, take back their country from the Americans and the UN and all the other self-serving interfering foreign powers.

This is where our rift occurred. The 12,000 troops running Haiti’s streets are from the UN; the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission is co-chaired by Bill Clinton whom, as Jean-Pierre himself had just reminded me, locals often call the governor or president of Haiti. So I asked Jean-Pierre, gently but a little skeptically, if he thought his foreigner-ousting goal was realistic.

no, the expedition was about finding and overland trail across the country! from coast to coast!

The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition by the United States of approximately 530 million acres (828,000 sq mi or 2,100,000 km²) of French territory on April 30, 1803, at the cost of about 3¢ per acre (7¢ per ha); totaling $15 million or 80 million French francs. Including interest, America finally paid $23,213,568 for the Louisiana territory.[1] The land purchased contained all of present-day Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota south of Mississippi River, much of North Dakota, nearly all of South Dakota, northeastern New Mexico, northern Texas, the portions of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide, and Louisiana on both sides of the Mississippi River, including the city of New Orleans. (The Oklahoma Panhandle, and southwestern portions of Kansas and Louisiana were still claimed by Spain at the time of the Purchase.) In addition, the Purchase contained small portions of land that would eventually become part of the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The land included in the purchase comprises around 23% of the territory of the modern United States.[1] The purchase was an important moment in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson. At the time, it faced domestic opposition as being possibly unconstitutional. Although he felt that the Constitution did not contain any provisions for acquiring territory, Jefferson decided to purchase Louisiana because he felt uneasy about France and Spain having the power to block American traders' access to the port of New Orleans.

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It about doubled the size of the territory of the U.S. Napoleon decided to sell it after deciding that an empire in Europe was more important than an empire in the Americas.

Home Curriculum Reading Like A Historian U.S. History Lessons Expansion & Slavery 2. Louisiana Purchase